Wednesday, 27 July 2016

Bad Breath (Halitosis)

In most cases, the cause of bad breath can be simple. However, if the issue is persistent, it can be a symptom of something more serious, and a problem sign of something to avoid long term.

  • Diet places a key role in bad breath, and the food you eat can often affect the smell of your breath.
  • Oral bacteria can cause an odour, and also indicate you have plaque build-up.
  • Dry mouth often affects your breath, as saliva (or lack thereof) affects plaque buildup and food particles from sticking to your teeth. Read more about dry mouth on the dry mouth page.
  • Smoking.
  • Unclean dentures. Just like teeth, dentures need to be cleaned regularly to keep them feeling, and smelling, fresh.
  • Some medical conditions, often affecting your liver or kidneys, can affect your breath. Alerting your dentist of previous medical conditions, or current medications is always a good idea.

To read the entire article , please visit plus.HealthyTeeth.org

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Monday, 25 July 2016

Monday, 18 July 2016

Treatment for Abscessed Teeth

Learn more about the treatment for abscessed teeth.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Wednesday, 6 July 2016

Dysphagia (Trouble Swallowing)

Those suffering from dysphagia, or trouble swallowing, can reduce their risk of chest infection or other serious issues by maintaining good oral health by keeping their mouth clean. Other medical issues include neuromuscular conditions, stroke, dementia, traumatic brain injury, gastroesophageal reflux disease, cancers of the head and neck and certain respiratory conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Aspiration pneumonia can also be caused when saliva, food or liquid goes down the trachea into the lungs, instead of the esophagus and into the stomach.

Risk of dysphagia increases with age and frailty, as well as smoking, excessive alcohol use, certain medications and poor oral hygiene including your teeth and dentures.

To read the entire article , please visit plus.HealthyTeeth.org

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net

Saturday, 2 July 2016

Pregnancy & Oral Health

Learn more about the risks to your oral health during pregnancy.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Cosmetic, Family General Dentistry
Gregory B. Garrett, DDS 
2215 Delaney Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403
Tel: (910) 763-3679
Website: WilmingtonSmiles.net